Monday, April 8, 2013

What's in a Name?

Gabriel
Gender:  Masculine
Usage:  French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Pronunciation:  ga-bree-EL (French), GAHP-ree-el (German), GAH-bryel (Spanish), GAY-bree-ǝl (English), GAHP-ryel (Polish)

Meaning & History
From the Hebrew name Gavri-el meaning "strong man of God."  In Hebrew tradition, Gabriel is the given name of one of the seven archangels.  [We don't agree with this number.  The Old Testament only mentions one archangel, Michael.  (Jude 1:9)   The word angel is derived from the Greek angelos, meaning "messenger."]  He appears as God's messenger in both the Old and New Testaments, announcing the birth of John to Zachariah and Jesus to Mary.  

This name has been in use occasionally in England since the 12th century but did not become popular in the English-speaking world until the 20th century. 




Esther - One Night With the King
Hadassah
Gender:  Feminine
Usage:  Biblical, Hebrew
Pronunciation:  hah-dass-SAH, hah-DASS-sah

Meaning & History
Means "myrtle tree" in Hebrew.  In the Old Testament, this was the Hebrew name of Esther, Queen of Persia.




Aragorn
Gender:  Masculine
Usage:  Literature

Meaning & History
Meaning unknown, though the first element is presumed Sindarin (a language of the Elves) -- ara "noble, kingly."  This is the given name of a character in J.R.R. Tolkien's trilogy "The Lord of the Rings" (1954).  In the books, Aragorn is the heir of the Dúnedain kings of the North, the kingdom of Gondor.








Elissa
Gender:  Feminine
Usage:  Roman mythology, English

Meaning & History
Meaning unknown, possibly Phoenician in origin.  This is another name of Dido, the legendary queen of Carthage.

Also, a variant of Elisa, which is derived from Elisabeth and Elizabeth, meaning "my God is an oath," or "my God is abundance."











Photo credit to Pinterest.
Yup.  ALL of them.  *heheh...*


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